Difference between revisions of "Frontend Auto Login"

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#Set Windows Styles
 
#Set Windows Styles
Style "*" RandomPlacement, DumbPlacement
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Style myth* NoTitle, NoHandles, Sticky, WindowListSkip, SloppyFocus, GrabFocus,  
 
Style myth* NoTitle, NoHandles, Sticky, WindowListSkip, SloppyFocus, GrabFocus,  
 
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''can someone who runs fvwm explain what this is all doing?''
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Style &lt;Window Title&gt; &lt;Style Settings&gt;
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The Window Title can be any valid window title, with * as a multiple character wildcard. Quotation marks must be used around titles that include spaces. ("Myth*" would match "Myth TV" as well as "MythA" but not "mythtv" or "MyMyth")
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* CascadePlacement style (formerly RandomPlacement and DumbPlacement styles) places new windows in a cascading fashion.
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* NoTitle, NoHandles, BorderWidth 0, HilightFore Black, HilightBack #c06077, and Color Black/#60a0c0 all work together to remove window decorations (title bar, window edges, etc.).
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* WindowListSkip removes windows from the WindowList (most window managers access this list by pressing alt-tab).
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* Sticky forces windows to remain visible on screen.
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* SloppyFocus and GrabFocus work to cause windows to take focus when the mouse passes over them.
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* StaysOnTop forces the window to the top layer (default top layer is layer number 6).
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For more information, visit [http://www.fvwm.org/documentation/manpages/ the FVWM Man Pages] or directly [http://www.fvwm.org/documentation/manpages/stable/fvwm.php FVWM version 2.6.5].
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-[[User:Meachamus.Prime|Meachamus.Prime]] 20:52, 11 January 2013 (UTC)
  
 
==== ratpoison ====
 
==== ratpoison ====

Revision as of 20:52, 11 January 2013

Part of a proper frontend system is having it automatically login as the mythtv user and loading mythfrontend. There are a variety of methods to do this. Method 1 covers using the systems initialization scripts, Method 2 uses the system's Graphical login managers like xdm/gdm/kdm allows for auto-login.

Note: The specific directories of files and programs listed below may be different for your distribution. Make sure to verify the location of these files for your system.

Method 1

The first method involves using the system's initialization scripts to automagically log in as the mythtv user (or whichever user you wish to run the MythTV frontend as) without using a graphical log in manager, and have mythfrontend launch. The user can then choose whether to use a GUI or to run "window-less".

System Boot Initialization

The standard command line login is considered a "virtual" terminal and uses a program called getty to provide the login prompt. We will replace the standard getty with an alternative, mingetty, which allows for an autologin feature. Depending on your chosen distribution one of the following setups will work for you, (may need to be slightly amended for your distribution).

mingetty vs openvt

The first method has the option of using mingetty or openvt. We will show the method for mingetty below as it requires a few extra steps. Further below we will briefly explain what needs to be modified to use openvt.

openvt has the advantage that if your distribution has a graphical boot sequence like Ubuntu, Red Hat, Mandriva, etc, you will not see any text before MythTV starts. It thus can look slightly more professional. This method also does not require the modification to the .bash_profile script.

inittab

inittab is one of the older initialization systems for SysV.

Initiall your inittab will look like,

Script.png /etc/inittab

# inittab for linux
id:1:initdefault:
rc::bootwait:/etc/rc
1:1:respawn:/etc/getty 9600 tty1
2:1:respawn:/etc/getty 9600 tty2
3:1:respawn:/etc/getty 9600 tty3
4:1:respawn:/etc/getty 9600 tty4

The exact number of virtual, ttyX, terminals will vary. Here the user will either replace, or add to the list the mingetty command. The user can also at this point decide if they wish to run fewer virtual terminals. This can save valuable memory for those running on low memory systems, but the amount is small; or they can eliminate them for "aesthetic" reasons. It is not recommended to only have the one MythTV terminal as a minimum of one standard should be kept in case of emergency.

As such, one of the lines will need to look similar to,

Script.png /etc/inittab

7:12345:respawn:/sbin/mingetty --autologin=mythtv tty7

The first portion of the line, is the id for that entry. It is generally accepted that a line with a single number for the id is to designate the launch of a virtual terminal. Adding a letter, A, B, or C will cause the line to be considered OnDemand. This is left to the user to google and decide whether it is how they would like their system set up. For the sake of this exercise in use with MythTV we will omit the letter.

This line, upon reboot, will cause a virtual terminal 7 to be created and the user mythtv will automatically, with no password prompt, be logged in.

You may also need to add the following to your '/etc/login.defs' file to allow a no password login,

Script.png /etc/login.defs

NO_PASSWORD_CONSOLE tty7

event.d / init.d for ttyX

Some distributions use a system that stores scripts in their /etc/event.d or /etc/init.d directory to handle daemon initialization. Here the user will see ttyX files that correspond to their virtual terminal number.

Here the user can decide to add to the virtual terminals and create a new one, or replace an existing one, and of course able to limit the number of virtual terminals as described above, again, keeping at least one standard terminal in case of emergency.

The standard ttyX file will look like,

Script.png /etc/event.d/tty6

# tty6 - getty
#
# This service maintains a getty on tty6 from the point the system is
# started until it is shut down again.

start on runlevel 2
start on runlevel 3

stop on runlevel 0
stop on runlevel 1
stop on runlevel 4
stop on runlevel 5
stop on runlevel 6

respawn
exec /sbin/getty 38400 tty6

The new ttyX file will thus need to look like

Script.png /etc/event.d/tty2

# tty2 - mingetty for MythTV
#
# This service maintains a mingetty on tty7 from the point the system is
# started until it is shut down again.

start on runlevel 2

stop on runlevel 0
stop on runlevel 1
stop on runlevel 3
stop on runlevel 4
stop on runlevel 5
stop on runlevel 6

respawn
exec /sbin/mingetty --autologin=mythtv tty2

This line, like above, upon reboot, will cause a virtual terminal 6 to be created and the user mythtv will automatically, with no password prompt, be logged in.

As well, like above, you may also need to add the following to your '/etc/login.defs' file to allow a no password login,

Script.png /etc/login.defs

NO_PASSWORD_CONSOLE tty2

UpStart

UpStart is one of the newer initialization systems written by Canonical for use in their Ubuntu distribution, and it's sub distributions Mythbunut, Kubuntu, etc. UpStart does not use the inittab file for login terminals. UpStart, like the init system uses scripts to launch daemons, etc. The user will find ttyX.conf files in their /etc/init directory where UpStart stores these files.

Here the user can decide to add to the virtual terminals and create a new one, or replace an existing one, and of course able to limit the number of virtual terminals as described above, again, keeping at least one standard terminal in case of emergency.

The standard ttyX.conf file will look like,

Script.png /etc/init/tty6.conf

# tty6 - getty
#
# This service maintains a getty on tty6 from the point the system is
# started until it is shut down again.

start on runlevel [23]
stop on runlevel [!23]

respawn
exec /sbin/getty -8 38400 tty6

The specifics, like the runlevel, may be different depending on your specific distribution. We will assume that you have the correct runlevels if you choose a terminal script that launches upon standard boot, as the template.

Thus, to use mingetty to login your mythtv user your ttyX.conf should look similar to,

Script.png /etc/init/tty6.conf

# tty6 - getty
#
# This service maintains a getty on tty6 from the point the system is
# started until it is shut down again.

start on runlevel [23]
stop on runlevel [!23]

respawn
exec /sbin/mingetty --autologin=mythtv tty6

This line, like above, upon reboot, will cause a virtual terminal 6 to be created and the user mythtv will automatically, with no password prompt, be logged in.

As well, like above, you may also need to add the following to your '/etc/login.defs' file to allow a no password login,

Script.png /etc/login.defs

NO_PASSWORD_CONSOLE tty7

Systemd (eg, Fedora15+)

Systemd is yet another system init service. See this page for a detailed list of what you need to do to set up auto-login for systemd. Generally you probably want to follow the instructions but use tty7 or possibly tty1 depending on your system.

You'll also need to turn off prefdm so it doesn't launch, which seems difficult since it's in the default target list in the system directories in /lib that you shouldn't modify. So replacing the prefdm.service with a local definition in /etc/systemd/system may be a solution:

   #  This file is part of systemd.
   #
   #  systemd is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify it
   #  under the terms of the GNU General Public License as published by
   #  the Free Software Foundation; either version 2 of the License, or
   #  (at your option) any later version.
   
   [Unit]
   Description=Display Manager
   After=syslog.target livesys-late.service rc-local.service systemd-user-sessions.service
   
   [Service]
   ExecStart=/bin/true
   RestartSec=0

The mythtv User

Once the user you wish to run mythfrontend as is set to automatically log in, we must prepare the users environment to actually log in and launch mythfrontend.

login shell

Some Myth-centric distributions create a mythtv user with no login shell. As such you will need to assign the user a login shell. This can be done through your distributions user editor, or via the command line as the root user (via su, sudo, etc),

usermod -s /bin/bash mythtv

.bash_profile

Once your user is automatically logged in the bash shell will look at certain files in the users home directory to modify how the shell works. We will use this to launch X via the .bash_profile file,

In that home directory, create/edit a .bash_profile file like this,

Script.png .bash_profile

if [ -z "$DISPLAY" ] && [ $(tty) == /dev/tty7 ]; then
    startx
fi

this will start X only if running on virtual terminal 7, so if you telnet or ssh into the box it will not react strange. Replace tty7 with the tty you chose to use above. This will also restart X when X crashes/shutsdown due to a mythfrontend crash.

.xinitrc

When X starts it looks to the users home directory for the .xinitrc file.

fvwm

fvwm is a popular lightweight window manager. To use fvwm, edit your .xinitrc like,

Script.png .xinitrc

xset -dpms s off
xsetroot -solid black
fvwm2 &
mythfrontend -l /home/mythtv/mythfrontend.log 2>&1
#mythtv-setup
#xterm

Next edit your .fvwm2rc,

Script.png .fvwm2rc

#Set Windows Styles
Style "*" CascadePlacement
Style myth* NoTitle, NoHandles, Sticky, WindowListSkip, SloppyFocus, GrabFocus, 
BorderWidth 0, HilightFore Black, HilightBack #c06077, Color Black/#60a0c0
Style xmame* NoTitle, NoHandles, Sticky, WindowListSkip, SloppyFocus, GrabFocus, 
BorderWidth 0, StaysOnTop,BoundaryWidth 0, HilightFore Black, HilightBack #c06077, 
Color Black/#60a0c0
Style mplayer* NoTitle, NoHandles, Sticky, WindowListSkip, SloppyFocus, GrabFocus, 
BorderWidth 0, HilightFore Black, HilightBack #c06077, Color Black/#60a0c0
Style xine* NoTitle, NoHandles, Sticky, WindowListSkip, SloppyFocus, GrabFocus, 
BorderWidth 0, HilightFore Black, HilightBack #c06077, Color Black/#60a0c0

#set the desk top size in units of physical screen size
DeskTopSize 1X1

# Starts mythfrontend from the keyboard using F1
Key F1  R   A   exec /usr/local/bin/mythfrontend -v important,general -l /var/log/mythfrontend.log 2>&1


Script.png .fvwm2rc

Style <Window Title> <Style Settings>

The Window Title can be any valid window title, with * as a multiple character wildcard. Quotation marks must be used around titles that include spaces. ("Myth*" would match "Myth TV" as well as "MythA" but not "mythtv" or "MyMyth")

  • CascadePlacement style (formerly RandomPlacement and DumbPlacement styles) places new windows in a cascading fashion.
  • NoTitle, NoHandles, BorderWidth 0, HilightFore Black, HilightBack #c06077, and Color Black/#60a0c0 all work together to remove window decorations (title bar, window edges, etc.).
  • WindowListSkip removes windows from the WindowList (most window managers access this list by pressing alt-tab).
  • Sticky forces windows to remain visible on screen.
  • SloppyFocus and GrabFocus work to cause windows to take focus when the mouse passes over them.
  • StaysOnTop forces the window to the top layer (default top layer is layer number 6).

For more information, visit the FVWM Man Pages or directly FVWM version 2.6.5. -Meachamus.Prime 20:52, 11 January 2013 (UTC)

ratpoison

Another popular lightweight window manager is ratpoison. To use ratpoison, edit your .xinitrc like,


Script.png .xinitrc

xset -dpms s off
xsetroot -solid black
ratpoison &
mythfrontend > /home/mythtv/mythfrontend.log 2>&1

And the associated .ratpoisonrc file,


Script.png .ratpoisonrc

# This is a sample .ratpoisonrc file
#
# Set the prefix key to that of screen's default
escape C-a

# put something informative on the screen while we load stuff
exec xloadimage -onroot -quiet -center /home/mythtv/.mythtv/mythtvstart.jpg

# Gets rid of that ugly crosshairs default cursor and set the background to black
exec xsetroot -cursor_name left_ptr

# Use the name of the program rather than the title in the window list
defwinname name

### fire up an xterm with ctrl-A x
bind x exec xterm -j -fn '*-courier-*-r-*-14-*'

# Since running a 720x576 definition the ratpoison screens are too big for the
# display so we reduce the size of them with defpadding to make them fit
#defpadding 25 25 25 25

keystate_numlock = enable

Note: The mythtvstart.jpg file is just something knocked up with the GIMP, the user can choose whichever image they wish to use. Editors Note: Can someone who runs fvwm explain what this is all doing?

openvt

Where above you see the use of mingetty',

/sbin/mingetty --autologin=mythtv tty6

the user can use openvt by using,

/bin/openvt -fwc 2 -- /bin/su - mythtv -c /usr/bin/startx >& /dev/null

Note: the 2 above tells openvt which virtual terminal number to use, so adjust it appropriately. This is described further below.

You may also need to add the following to your '/etc/login.defs' file to allow a no password login,

Script.png /etc/login.defs

NO_PASSWORD_CONSOLE tty2

The command, /usr/bin/startx >& /dev/null, should be tested to verify that the the mythtv user is authorized to start the X server. If not, modify your /etc/X11/Xwrapper.conf file to include:

allowed_users=anybody

Optional

The user can choose to add some extra functionality to their .xinitrc, some popular options are,

VNC

Adding the following before mythfrontend will allow the user to connect to the machine via VNC. Proper setup of VNC is left to the user to manage.

x11vnc -many -q -bg -rfbauth .vnc/passwd
log rotation

Ideally the user will use the lograte daemon, logrotated, to rotate their log files. If this method does not please the user another option is to add the following before launching mythfrontend,

Script.png .xinitrc

for i in 5 4 3 2 1 ; do
  if [ -f mythfrontend.log.$i ]; then
    mv -f mythfrontend.log.$i  mythfrontend.log.$(($i + 1))
  fi
done

openvt

Where above we used mingetty, this method uses openvt, and as such, where above you see

/sbin/mingetty --autologin=mythtv tty6

this method will use

/bin/openvt -fwc 2 -- /bin/su - mythtv -c /usr/bin/startx >& /dev/null

Note: the 2 above tells openvt which virtual terminal number to use, so adjust it appropriately as per above

As well, like above, you may also need to add the following to your '/etc/login.defs' file to allow a no password login,

Script.png /etc/login.defs

NO_PASSWORD_CONSOLE tty2

The user should test the command above, /usr/bin/startx >& /dev/null, to verify that the the mythtv user is authorized to start the X server. If not, modify your /etc/X11/Xwrapper.conf file to include:

allowed_users=anybody

This command will start X as the mythtv user, and much like above, will restart X automatically if MythTV or X crash. This option has the advantage that if your distribution has a graphical boot sequence like Ubuntu, Red Hat, Mandriva, etc, you will not see any text before MythTV starts. It thus can look slightly more professional. This method also does not require the modification to the .bash_profile script.

The user must still edit the .xinitrc file according to the directions above.

Distribution Specific

If a distribution requires some special modification to the above place instructions on those changes here.

Method 2

The final method is to use the standard graphical login managers such as GDM and KDM to automatically log the user in and to use the graphical window manager to launch mythfrontend. Because this method can be very distribution specific this section is broken up as such.

Generic autostart using freedesktop.org standard.

There is no standard way to auto-login a user. However, once logged in there is a standard way to launch applications defined by freedesktop.org using a desktop file in $XDG_CONFIG_DIRS/autostart. Nowadays, this works in most distributions and desktops. Also, there are standard GUI tools to maintain this file. The mechanics:

Create a desktop file, something like

Script.png mythtv desktop file

[Desktop Entry]
Encoding=UTF-8
Name=mythTV frontend
Comment=Record, playback and watch TV.
Icon=mythfrontend.png
Exec=sh -c "pasuspender mythfrontend; pkill xfce4-session"
Terminal=false
Type=Application
X-Desktop-File-Install-Version=0.16
Categories=AudioVideo;Application;X-Fedora-Extra;

Install the file in ~/.config/autostart. If you are using lirc, you might consider creating similar file(s) to autostart irexec and/or lircmd.

KDM Auto Login

KDM is the graphical login manager created for use with the KDE windowing system.

KDM configuration

To set KDM to automatically login your mythtv user, edit your KDM configuration file, /etc/kde3/kdm/kdmrc or /usr/share/config/kdm/kdmrc, to modify or include the following lines,


Script.png kdmrc

[X-:0-Core]
AutoLoginDelay=10
AutoLoginEnable=true
AutoLoginAgain=true
AutoLoginUser=mythtv

AutoLoginDelay and AutoLoginAgain are optional, but recommended if you are allowing other users to log in normally.

KDE Autostart

For the user which will be set to log in automatically, create a link in the users .kde/Autostart/ directory that points either to a script that will launch mythfrontend or to mythfrontend directly itself. When exiting mythfrontend, the user will be left at the normal KDE desktop.

Instead, if you wish to skip the KDE desktop and window manager entirely, create ~/.xprofile and ~/.xsession files in the user's home directory. This method, combined with AutoLoginAgain=true, will restart MythTV automatically upon crashes:


Script.png .xprofile

# Tell kdm to use the custom session in ~/.xsession
session=custom


Script.png .xsession

#! /bin/bash
# Start minimal window manager in background
evilwm &
# ratpoison &
# startfluxbox &
# starte16 &
# Start mythfrontend as the controlling instance
mythfrontend

Make sure ~/.xsession is executable!

GDM Auto Login

GDM is the graphical login manager created for use with the Gnome windowing system.

GDM configuration

To set GDM to automatically login your mythtv user, edit your GDM configuration file, which can be found in one of various locations depending on your distribution, /etc/gdm/custom.conf /etc/gdm/gdm.conf-custom

adding or modifying the following lines,

Script.png gdm config file

[daemon]
AutomaticLoginEnable=true
AutomaticLogin=mythtv

If you'd like to be able to login as a different user before GDM logs in your mythtv user, replace the AutomaticLogin lines in your GDM configuration with TimedLogin lines. This example will wait 10 seconds before logging in the mythtv user,


Script.png gdm config file

[daemon]
TimedLoginEnable=true
TimedLogin=mythtv
TimedLoginDelay=10

Gnome Autostart

Next, create and edit .gnomerc in the user's home folder,

Script.png .gnomerc

sleep 10 && mythfrontend > /tmp/mythfrontend.log 2>&1 &

This file needs to have specific permissions, to change them run

chmod 755 .gnomerc

from the users home directory.


NoDM auto-login

The display manager called nodm is designed exactly for embedded systems with authenticationless GUIs. It's packaged in Debian, and presumably in other distros too.

Here's my /etc/default/nodm from a Debian-based frontend:


Script.png /etc/default/nodm

# nodm configuration

# Set NODM_ENABLED to something different than 'false' to enable nodm
NODM_ENABLED=true

# User to autologin for
NODM_USER=mythtv

# First vt to try when looking for free VTs
NODM_FIRST_VT=7

# X session
NODM_XSESSION=/etc/X11/Xsession

# Options for the X server
NODM_X_OPTIONS='-nolisten tcp'

# If an X session will run for less than this time in seconds, nodm will wait an
# increasing bit of time before restarting the session.
NODM_MIN_SESSION_TIME=60

You'll need to set up the mythtv user for xsession in the usual way; here's my ~mythtv/.xsessionrc and ~mythtv/.xsession (adapt to your tastes):

Script.png ~mythtv/.xsessionrc

# -*- shell-script -*-
# Sourced as:
#  /bin/sh
#    /etc/X11/Xsession
#      /etc/X11/Xsession.d/40x11-common_xsessionrc

# Timezone
TZ=Europe/London; export TZ

# Tell Qt to anti-alias text
QT_XFT=1; export QT_XFT

# Don't start ssh-agent
SSHAGENT=


Script.png ~mythtv/.xsession

# -*- shell-script -*-
# Sourced as:
#  /bin/sh
#    /etc/X11/Xsession
#      /etc/X11/Xsession.d/99x11-common_start

xsetroot -solid blue

(
    xset -dpms s off
    sleep 3                     # Give frontend some CPU

    # Keyboard
    setxkbmap \
        -types "complete" \
        -compat "complete+ledscroll(group_lock)" \
        -symbols "pc+us(dvorak)+group(shifts_toggle)+ctrl(nocaps)+inet(logiex110)" \
        -geometry "pc(pc105)"

    exec fvwm
) &

(
    sleep 5                     # Give frontend some CPU
    killall -u $USER irexec
    exec irexec
) &

exec mythfrontend

Set up your preferred window manager as described in #The mythtv User above.

Distribution Specific Notes

Ubuntu 12.04 LTS

Ubuntu 12.04 uses LightDM by default.

Create a new file /usr/share/xsessions/custom.desktop with:

[Desktop Entry]
Name=Xsession
Exec=/etc/X11/Xsession

You should now have a new session option during login, Xsession will load the user's ~/.xsession file

edit /etc/lightdm/lightdm.conf

[SeatDefaults]
autologin-guest=false
autologin-user=username
autologin-user-timeout=0
autologin-session=lightdm-autologin
user-session=Xsession
greeter-session=unity-greeter

For mythbuntu change the last two lines to:

greeter-session=lightdm-gtk-greeter
user-session=mythbuntu

Note: the autologin might remember the last session you logged in as and start that one, so if this happens you might want to login once into the custom xsession, then reboot and see if the autologin will log you into the right session.

Create a .xsession in your homedir:

xset -dpms s off
xsetroot -sold black
/usr/bin/mythfrontend &
exec /usr/bin/blackbox

chmod +x .xsession

Fedora Core 5 - GDM

Older GDM requires the use of the users .xsession file.

Set the ~/.xsession file for your mythtv user to start mythwelcome.

An example ~/.xsession file , which will start the Metacity window manager, an xterm (which you can start with F12 from mythwelcome) and finally, mythwelcome itself is shown here:

Important.png Note: If mythwelcome dies for some reason, GDM will restart it.

Script.png ~mythtv/.xsession

#!/bin/bash
metacity &
xterm &
mythwelcome

Make sure to make it executeable:

 chmod 755 ~mythtv/.xsession

Fedora Core

Fedora Core 6 uses a script to let you choose which login manager to use. If no default is given it uses xdm. You can set the default by creating a file called /etc/sysconfig/desktop and adding

DISPLAYMANAGER="KDE"

or

DISPLAYMANAGER="GNOME"

KDE

Once this file is there then you can set the auto login from within KDE like so:

  1. Click on the K menu.
  2. In the K menu, click on Control Center.
  3. When the control center screen appers there is a list of options to pick. Select the System option.
  4. The System menu will expand and give a list of sub menus - click on Login Manager.
  5. When the login manager is displayed there are tabs that you can select Appearance/Font/Background/Sessions/Users/Convenience. Click on the Convenience tab.
  6. Go to the Automatic Login box, you will see there is 2 check boxes and a drop down menu. Click Enable Auto-login. Select user from the drop down menu.
  7. Click the Apply button down on the bottom right.
  8. Close window. The automatic login process will take effect when you restart your computer.

GDM / Gnome

You can specify the window manager of your choice and the programs executed on starting X Windows in your own ~/.xsession file. In order to ensure your own ~/.xsession is executed you need to

  1. Click the Sessions menu at the bottom of the GDM automatic login screen
  2. Select "User script"

This will force the execution of ~/.xsession file. Note: You may have to click a username first in the login window in order to get the menu bar to display at the bottom of the GDM auto-login screen.

LightDM

Create a new file /usr/share/xsessions/custom.desktop with:

[Desktop Entry]
Name=Xsession
Exec=/etc/X11/Xsession

You should now have a new session option during login, Xsession will load the user's ~/.xsession file

Fedora 9

In /etc/gdm/custom.conf in the [daemon] section ensure you have the following lines present (subsitute "myth" for your mythtv user).

[daemon]
TimedLoginEnable=true
TimedLoginDelay=5
AutomaticLoginEnable=true
AutomaticLogin=myth
TimedLogin=myth
RemoteGreeter=/usr/libexec/gdmgreeter

Fedora 16

There have been conflicting reports that F16 no longer supports the /etc/gdm/custom.conf stuff above. A fresh build of Fedora 16 using the following /etc/gdm/custom.conf worked flawlessly with auto-login. Your mileage may vary.

# GDM configuration storage

[daemon]
AutomaticLoginEnable=true
AutomaticLogin=mythtv

[security]

[xdmcp]

[greeter]

[chooser]

[debug]

If the above does not work as expected, Fedora 16 auto-login can be adjusted from the GUI. Invoke the System Settings | User Accounts tool from a gnome session. Using this tool, mark the mythtv user as auto-login (it's just a click). Within this GUI, F16 requires the password to be empty for auto-login to work.

Auto Login and Graphical Login

If you want to be able to easily change between auto-login and normal gdm/kdm/xdm login you can restrict the autologin to a specific runlevel and the graphical login to another.

openSUSE 10.2

If you want to be able to easily change between auto-login and normal xdm login you can restrict the autologin to eg. runlevel 3, so the auto-start line is /etc/inittab looks like this:


Script.png /etc/inittab

6:3:respawn:/usr/bin/openvt -fwc 2 -- /bin/su - mythtv -c /usr/bin/startx >& /dev/null

The default runlevel specification in inittab can then be set to 3 for auto-login or 5 for X-login.


Script.png /etc/inittab

id:3:initdefault:             # auto-login to MythTv

If you have booted in auto-login mode and want to change to X-login mode you can just change run level with the init command:

/sbin/init 5

or back to mythtv mode with:

/sbin/init 3

Geeko head48.png see the Opensuse_10.2 page